FGV sells more biodiesel to China

KUALA LUMPUR (Bernama): Felda Global Ventures Holdings Bhd (FGV) is expanding its biodiesel business in China with the second shipment of 6,000 tonnes of palm oil methyl ester (PME) to Dongguan Port, Guangdong.


The company successfully made a maiden shipment of 6,000 tonnes of PME to Nansha Port, Guangzhou, last month.

Group president and chief executive officer Mohd Emir Mavani Abdullah said the first shipment was a highly significant development for FGV’s biodiesel ambitions.

“By successfully penetrating the China market, FGV is on track to achieving its biodiesel global growth targets.

“China is one of the biggest biodiesel markets in the world. Given its huge energy requirements and reliance on biodiesel imports, we can meet this demand by virtue of being Malaysia’s largest PME exporter,” he said in a statement yesterday.

FGV currently accounts for 31.59 per cent of Malaysia’s PME exports, he said, adding biodiesel trade between China and Malaysia is poised to rise, based on the former’s rapidly growing interest in renewable energy.

From January to August, China had imported 590,777 tonnes of biodiesel from around the world.

The usage of PME is gaining popularity because the growing of the feedstock is sustainable from its economic, environment and social aspects. Fossil energy balance, which is the ratio between renewable energy output and fossil energy input is a good factor to compare biofuel sources. 

Topping the list is PME with a fossil energy balance of 9. This means that a litre of palm oil biofuel contains nine times the amount of energy as that required for its production. Sugar cane has values ranging from 2 to 8. Other feedstocks such as rapeseed, soya and corn have values which fall between 1 and 4.

When it comes to yield productivity, sugar cane and palm oil rank the highest. Sugar cane yields 6,000 litres of biofuel per hectare (l/ha), followed by oil palm and sugar beet (5,000-6,000 l/ha) but palm oil is superior as it has 27 per cent higher energy content (30.53 MJ/l) than ethanol from sugarcane (24MJ/l). 

Moderately efficient feedstock’s such as corn, cassava and sweet sorghum yield 1,500-4,000 litres of biofuel per hectare( l/ha). Rapeseed, wheat and soya are the least efficient, yielding less than 1,500 l/ha.