Oh no! Not the sun ...

What has palm oil got to do with swimming? It's in the sunscreen :)

If you're going to be exercising in the water, it's worth getting a sunscreen resistant to water and sweat.

People who have sensitive skin or skin conditions like rosacea should use sunscreens designed for children. 

Go for titanium dioxide or zinc oxide instead of chemicals like para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), dioxybenzone, oxybenzone, or sulisobenzone. 

If you have skin irritation or allergies, avoid sunscreens with alcohol, fragrances, or preservatives.

Sunscreens help shield you from the sun's dangerous ultraviolet (UV) rays in two ways. 

Some work by scattering the light, reflecting it away from your body. 

Others absorb the UV rays before they reach your skin.

A few years ago, choosing a good sunscreen meant you just looked for a high sun protection factor (SPF) -- which rates how well the sunscreen protects against one type of cancer-causing UV ray, ultraviolet B (UVB). SPF refers to blockage of UVB rays only.

Research soon showed that ultraviolet A rays (UVA) also increase skin cancer risk. While UVA rays don't cause sunburn, they penetrate deeply into skin and cause wrinkles. Medical practitioners estimate that up to 90% of skin changes associated with aging are really caused by a lifetime's exposure to UVA rays.